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Our unique interdisciplinary team approach, personalized treatment plans, and comprehensive array of services will put you on the right path.

Services Overview
We offer a full range of surgical and non-surgical services. 

Conditions 
Take a look at some of the conditions we treat.


Services Overview

A comprehensive array of services for the most effective treatment plans 
From state-of-the-art diagnostic tools like CT, MRI, injections, and diagnostics to a full range of treatment options, you’ll find everything you need within our Spine Center.

In addition to total care coordination, our comprehensive services include: 

  • Neurology/Physiatry (M.D. who specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation) 
  • Neurosurgery 
  • Orthopaedic spine surgery 
  • Physical therapy 
  • High-tech imaging 
  • Pain injections 
  • Ongoing spine care programs for those whose conditions require it 
  • Chiropractic services 

Conditions

Common conditions we treat at the Spine Center
Whether the cause of your back or neck pain is some kind of injury (work related, car accident, or athletic) or an underlying medical condition, our Spine Center can help.

The following are common conditions that we see—but please keep in mind that this list is not all-encompassing, and your specific condition may not be included. In addition to general back and neck pain complaints, we’ve successfully treated:

Glossary

Acute back and neck pain: Acute pain may begin suddenly and is often described as feeling “sharp.” Acute pain may be resolved quickly, although by definition it may last up to six months. It is important to control acute pain to prevent it from becoming chronic.

Degenerative disc disease: Degenerative disc disease (DDD) usually affects older people because it’s caused by the effects of aging on the spine. The intervertebral discs can become stiff and rigid, causing pain and other symptoms.

Degenerative joint disease: Also known as osteoarthritis, this disease of the joints is the most common form of arthritis, affecting more than 20 million American adults. It is caused by cartilage breakdown; cartilage provides a cushion between the bones of the joints. Healthy cartilage allows bones to glide over one another and acts as a shock absorber during physical movement. In osteoarthritis, the cartilage breaks down and wears away, causing the bones under the cartilage to rub together, causing pain, swelling, and loss of joint motion.

Herniated discs: A “slipped disc” can happen anywhere in the spine, although does not actually “slip”—the disc, located between the bones of the spine (vertebrae), actually splits or ruptures. The inner gel-like substance (nucleus pulposus) leaks out, and this is called a herniation of the nucleus pulposus—or a herniated disc. People between the ages of 30 and 50 are most at risk for herniation because the elasticity and water content of the nucleus pulposus decrease with age.

Osteoarthritis: Also know as degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting more than 20 million American adults. It is caused by cartilage breakdown; cartilage provides a cushion between the bones of the joints. Healthy cartilage allows bones to glide over one another and acts as a shock absorber during physical movement. In osteoarthritis, the cartilage breaks down and wears away. This causes the bones under the cartilage to rub together, causing pain, swelling, and loss of joint motion.

Osteoporotic compression fractures: A compression fracture is a common fracture of the spine that implies that the vertebral body has suffered a crush or wedging injury (the vertebral body is the block of bone that makes up the spinal column).

Sciatica: Sciatica isn't actually a condition: it's a medical term used to describe symptoms—the shooting pain, tingling, and numbness—caused by a low back condition. It could be caused by a bulging disc or a herniated disc, degenerative disc disease, piriformis syndrome, pregnancy, spinal stenosis, a spinal tumor or spinal infection, spondylolisthesis, or trauma. Any of these conditions can put pressure on the sciatic nerve or related nerve roots in the low back, and that pressure is what causes pain and other symptoms.

Spinal deformity (scoliosis, kyphosis): Adult spinal deformity can be divided into problems of the sagittal plane, problems of the coronal plane, and problems of both planes. The sagittal plane divides the body vertically into left and right sides. The coronal plane is also called the frontal plane and divides the body front (anterior) and back (posterior). Scoliosis, kyphosis, and sagittal imbalance are types of spinal deformity.

Spinal infections: Infections of the spinal column include diseases that arise spontaneously and those that are secondary to some inciting event. True infections are uncommon, particularly in the industrialized countries of the world. Examples include discitis (disc space infection), vertebral osteomyelitis (an infection in the vertebral body itself), epidural abscesses (infections that form in the space around the dura, the tissue envelope that surrounds the spinal cord and nerve root), and post-operative wound infections.

Spinal stenosis: Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal, which places pressure on the spinal cord. If the stenosis is located on the lower part of the spinal cord, it is called lumbar spinal stenosis. Stenosis in the upper part of the spinal cord is called cervical spinal stenosis. While spinal stenosis can be found in any part of the spine, the lumbar and cervical areas are the most commonly affected.

Spondylosis: Spondylosis (also known as spinal osteoarthritis) is a degenerative disorder that may cause loss of normal spinal structure and function. Although aging is the primary cause, the location and rate of degeneration is individual. The degenerative process of spondylosis may affect the cervical (neck), thoracic (mid-back), or lumbar (low back) regions of the spine.

Spinal tumors: Spinal tumors are rare and are either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancer). Tumors may encroach into the spinal canal and compress the cord.

Trauma: Despite the protective functions of the discs, ligaments, and muscles, the spine is subject to traumatic injuries like any other area of the skeletal system, but the pattern of fractures are unique to the spine. Examples of spinal trauma include fractures and whiplash injuries.