Home  |  Contact Us  |  Site Map  |  Staff Tools  |  Classes  |  Newsroom

  Chat Transcript
Open Q&A and Heart Health – Colleen Gladstone, C.D.E., February 12, 2013

Colleen@ Unity:
Welcome to the Unity Diabetes Online Community! I’m Colleen Gladstone, a certified diabetes educator, and I’ll be hosting today’s chat. We’re glad you could join us. We’ll be talking about heart health since February is American Heart Month and answering all of your diabetes-related questions.
 Colleen@ Unity:
 Before we get started let me just tell you how we’ll address your questions and comments today. I answer questions one at a time, in the order that they are posted to the site, and there might be a slight delay as I respond to each question. It may take a few minutes for me to type answers to your questions, so please stay logged-in to the chat to see my response, even if it takes a few minutes.
 Colleen@ Unity:

 And you might need to refresh every few minutes to keep up with the latest posts in the chat if you switch to another application on your computer. Let’s get started.

 Colleen@ Unity:
Heart disease is a serious complication of diabetes. Did you know that people with diabetes are twice as likely to die from a heart attack?
lucyblue:  
Hi Colleen, Why is that? 
 Colleen@ Unity:
The good news is that the risk of heart attack may be reduced by keeping blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels under control.
Colleen@ Unity:  
Hi lucyblue! Thanks for your question. People with diabetes tend to have narrowing of their blood vessels, typically as a result of higher blood glucose levels, elevated blood pressure and fat deposits. 
dbhattac12345:  
I take my glucometer reading everyday after getting out of bed in the morning. The reading generally stays between 140-165 most of the time. Once in a while I get like 180 – 185, though I did not had any major change in my supper menu. Is there any reason for this?
Colleen@ Unity:  
For people who smoke, there is an even higher risk of cardiovascular complications. 
 Colleen@ Unity:  
Yes dbhattac12345! Many people with diabetes experience what is referred to as 'dawn phenomenon'.
 Colleen@ Unity:  
 In the early morning hours various hormones are released that help us to move from sleep into wakefulness. These hormones compete with insulin, decreasing the ability to regulate our blood sugar level.
dbhattac12345:  
Does drinking (in moderation, one glass of wine or one beer twice a week) affects blood sugar level? 
Colleen@ Unity: 
 If your blood sugar tends to be higher in the morning, it is best to avoid fruit and juices at least for a couple hours after waking.
dbhattac12345:  
 Does the blood sugar drop immediately (like within 30 minutes ) after exercise?
 Colleen@ Unity:
Good question! As long as alcohol does not interact with your medication, and you include the carbohydrates in your meal plan, an occasional alcoholic beverage is fine.
Colleen@ Unity: 
 Just be sure you do not drink alcohol on an empty stomach, as this increases your risk of hypoglycemia!
 Colleen@ Unity: 
The time it takes for your blood glucose to drop and the degree to which it drops, is dependent on a number of factors.
Colleen@ Unity: 
It is always best to test your BG before exercising, and to eat a snack if it is below 100-120 to prevent hypoglycemia. 
Colleen@ Unity:  
It is also a good idea to keep a quick acting carb handy, such as glucose tablets, jelly beans, juice, in case your blood glucose drops too low. 
 Colleen@ Unity:  
How vigorous you exercise and the amount of time you are active may contribute to how quickly your blood glucose may drop. 
 Colleen@ Unity: 
It is always a good idea to test your blood sugar after you have finished exercising. 
Colleen@ Unity:  
Exercise is beneficial to reducing the risk of heart disease. It helps not only to control blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol, but also reduces stress, which may contribute to heart disease. 
dbhattac12345:  
I test my blood glucose in the morning after waking up and then in the evening after swimming for half hour. I also do weights and cardio( treadmill) in the morning for half hour. 
 Colleen@ Unity:
Good for you!! 30 minutes of exercise, at least 5 days a week is what is recommended, so you are doing a great thing for your health! 
Colleen@ Unity:  
 For people who have physical limitations, starting slow is important. Even 5-10 minutes is a good start! Gradually working up to longer periods of time, or dividing exercise time into two to three, 10 minute segments throughout the day makes a difference!
Colleen@ Unity:   
 That’s all the time we have for today. I’ve really enjoyed our conversation and hope that I was able to provide some insight for you. If we didn’t get to your question today or if you think of another question later on – feel free to jump into the conversation in the forum, or submit a question using our “Ask an expert” feature. Be sure to join us for our next chat Tuesday, February 26 at 8 p.m. with Dr. Rajamani. He is an endocrinologist from the Diabetes Center and will be answering all of your diabetes questions!
lucyblue:  
 Thanks Colleen, very informative!
 
 
Diabetes events and classes to help you get the support you need. Diabetes classes and diabetes events
September 18, 2014
9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

 
Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Phone: (585) 368-4560
© 2013 Unity Health System, Rochester, N.Y.