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  Chat Transcript
Open Q&A with Dr. Bingham, July 11, 2012
 Dr. Bingham @ Unity:

 Welcome to the Unity Diabetes Online Community! I’m Dr. Bingham and I’ll be hosting today’s chat. We’re glad you could join us today. I’m excited to answer all of your diabetes-related questions. Before we get started let me just tell you how we’ll address your questions and comments today. I answer questions one at a time, in the order that they are posted to the site, and there might be a slight delay as I respond to each question.

It may take a few minutes for me to type answers to your questions, so please stay logged-in to the chat to see my response, even if it takes a few minutes. And you might need to refresh every few minutes to keep up with the latest posts in the chat if you switch to another application on your computer.

Let’s get started.

 sassy35:
 I'm having surgery next month – will I have to do anything special before or after the surgery to test my BGs or take my insulin?
 Dr. Bingham @ Unity:
 In reference to surgery and diabetes – it is very important to plan ahead! It is important to let your surgeon know that you have diabetes and to make sure to have an accurate list of all of your medications (including the ones for diabetes) when you see the surgeon. Usually they will give you directions as far as which medicines to take (and doses) the day before and the day of surgery. After surgery, the surgical team will be responsible for ordering blood sugar checks in the hospital.
  sassy35:
 That's good advice – I'll make sure my doctor has all of the info he needs. Can I use my own supplies while I am in the Hospital?
Dr. Bingham @ Unity:
  The surgical team will also be responsible for managing your blood sugars. Often in the hospital insulin is the safest way to manage the diabetes. If you were not on insulin before the hospitalization, it doesn't mean that you will have to go home on insulin, but again it is often the safest way to control sugars in the hospital setting. Typically, they will not allow you to use your own testing supplies or medications in the hospital. The one exception is insulin pumps and pump supplies.
 
 lucyblue:
 Hi Dr. Bingham, I have type 2 diabetes - should I see an endocrinologist? My blood sugars are in the 200s a lot of the time and I do take metformin and glipizide.
 sassy35:
 What will they do if my blood sugars get really high? Is that common after surgery?
 Dr. Bingham @ Unity:
 As an endocrinologist I must say my answer is probably biased – but yes it sounds like you might benefit from seeing an endocrinologist as it appears that your blood sugars are not under perfect control. Most insurance companies do not require a "referral", so you can call and schedule an appointment yourself. Nationally only about 10% of people who have diabetes see an endocrinologist.
 lucyblue:
 OK thanks. By the way, what is considered good control for someone like me?
 Dr. Bingham @ Unity:
 Good control depends upon an individual person – our goals are different depending upon the situation. Typically we like to see the pre-breakfast readings < 120 and 2 hour after meals readings of less than <160.
  Dr. Bingham @ Unity:
 Any other questions today?
sassy35:
  Thanks, Dr. Bingham - it's good to know what to expect.
 Dr. Bingham @ Unity:

 That’s all the time we have for today. I’ve really enjoyed our conversation and hope that I was able to provide some insight for you. If we didn’t get to your question today or if you think of another question later on – feel free to jump into the conversation in the forum, or submit a question using our “Ask an expert” feature.

Be sure to join us for our next chat Wednesday, August 8 at 12 p.m. – an open Q&A session with Elva Parker, C.D.E.

 
 
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